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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:BROWN UNIVERSITY IN PROVIDENCE IN THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS
Doing Business As Name:Brown University
PD/PI:
  • Robert Preucel
  • (401) 863-5725
  • robert_preucel@brown.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Nomaan Hasan
Award Date:08/02/2021
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 22,126
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 22,126
  • FY 2021=$22,126
Start Date:09/01/2021
End Date:08/31/2022
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.075
Primary Program Source:040100 R&RA ARP Act DEFC V
Award Title or Description:Doctoral Dissertation Research: Resilience, Religion, and Political Change
Federal Award ID Number:2116593
DUNS ID:001785542
Parent DUNS ID:001785542
Program:Cult Anthro DDRI
Program Officer:
  • Siobhan Mattison
  • (703) 292-2967
  • smattiso@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:BOX 1929
City:Providence
State:RI
ZIP:02912-9002
County:Providence
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Brown Univeristy
Street:350 Eddy Street
City:Providence
State:RI
ZIP:02912-9002
County:Providence
Country:US
Cong. District:01

Abstract at Time of Award

This award is funded in whole or in part under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (Public Law 117-2). The separation of religious institutions from governmental affairs is a common principle of democratic governments. In settings where religious affiliations are associated with other aspects of heritage and individuals’ identities, the principles of secularism may be implemented in varying ways. This doctoral dissertation research investigates reciprocal relationships between secularism and political change through the theoretical lens of resilience, asking whether and how devout individuals incorporate new concepts and identities to accommodate political shifts away from secularism. In addition to training a doctoral student, the project plans to disseminate findings widely to academic and non-academic audiences. Specifically, this project tests the hypotheses that democratic political transformations result in increasing proximity between religion and secularism, and that individuals leverage this proximity as a means of resilience to political changes targeting identity. Over twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork, the investigators use a combination of participant observation, semi-structured interviews, digital ethnography, and diary methods to test these hypotheses. Research questions include (1) how religious individuals understand and interpret secularism as a way of responding to political change; and (2) how individuals use traditional religious principles in conjunction with novel elements in response to political change. The research contributes a novel synthesis of resilience theory and religion to investigate the broad means by which humans adjust to changing political environments. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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