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Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN
Doing Business As Name:University of Texas at Austin
PD/PI:
  • David Wu
  • (434) 243-4245
  • dwu4@cs.utexas.edu
Award Date:09/21/2021
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 499,186
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 389,661
  • FY 2019=$389,661
Start Date:09/01/2021
End Date:12/31/2022
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.070
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:SaTC: CORE: Small: Expanding the Frontiers of Lattice-Based Cryptography
Federal Award ID Number:2151131
DUNS ID:170230239
Parent DUNS ID:042000273
Program:Secure &Trustworthy Cyberspace
Program Officer:
  • Nina Amla
  • (703) 292-7991
  • namla@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:3925 W Braker Lane, Ste 3.340
City:Austin
State:TX
ZIP:78759-5316
County:Austin
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:10

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of Texas at Austin
Street:
City:
State:TX
ZIP:78759-5316
County:Austin
Country:US
Cong. District:10

Abstract at Time of Award

Research and development into quantum computers raises many new challenges for security and privacy. For instance, large-scale quantum computers would compromise much of the cryptography used to secure the Internet today. This project's novelty is in developing new and systematic approaches for constructing advanced cryptographic primitives that remain robust even in the presence of sophisticated quantum adversaries. The project's impacts are in enabling and realizing new and secure cryptographic primitives and mechanisms to safeguard our critical digital infrastructure from the potential threat posed by quantum computers. The focus of this project is on lattice-based cryptography, a popular class of mathematical assumptions believed to be resistant against quantum attacks. This project investigates new constructions of core cryptographic primitives, such as zero-knowledge proof systems, pseudorandom functions, and software watermarking from standard lattice-based assumptions. These primitives are important building blocks in systems for outsourcing computations in the cloud as well as for protecting against unauthorized distribution of software. In addition, the investigator develops new cryptography courses and advises undergraduate and graduate students to prepare them with the expertise necessary for designing the next generation of secure computing systems. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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