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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, THE
Doing Business As Name:Washington University
PD/PI:
  • Anne M Hofmeister
  • (314) 935-7440
  • hofmeist@levee.wustl.edu
Award Date:07/29/2021
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 69,593
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 69,593
  • FY 2021=$69,593
Start Date:08/15/2021
End Date:07/31/2022
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 R&RA ARP Act DEFC V
Award Title or Description:Upgrade of an Infrared Spectrometer (with Electronics Replacement) for Quantitative Analysis, Focusing on H-species and Concentrations at Temperatures
Federal Award ID Number:2035778
DUNS ID:068552207
Parent DUNS ID:068552207
Program:Instrumentation & Facilities
Program Officer:
  • David Lambert
  • (703) 292-4736
  • dlambert@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:CAMPUS BOX 1054
City:Saint Louis
State:MO
ZIP:63130-4862
County:Saint Louis
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Washington University
Street:
City:Saint Louis
State:MO
ZIP:63130-4899
County:Saint Louis
Country:US
Cong. District:01

Abstract at Time of Award

This award is funded in whole or in part under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (Public Law 117-2). It will provide funds to upgrade a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (DA3-FTIR). The instrument covers a wide range of light wavelengths and has accessories for high and low temperatures as well as high pressure which makes the instrument useful in addressing an extensive range of problems. Examples of the breadth of supported research are collaborative studies in medicine (bone growth) and ongoing studies in astronomy (identifying dust ejected from old stars). However, the primary focus of the instrument has been on problems important to the geological, planetary and materials science. The upgraded instrument will add to the infrastructure and will help advance fundamental issues while providing opportunities for education and training. The instrument has been used by students at all levels plus students of other faculty at Washington U. and at U. Missouri. The laboratory plans to continue probing the fundamental principles that govern the interaction of heat with matter, and to apply these findings to the Earth and beyond. The existing Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (DA3-FTIR) in this laboratory has been used in diverse and numerous research projects since its funding by NSF three decades ago. The DA3-FTIR is a high-end research instrument, with 5 pairs of detectors and beam-splitters that altogether cover the far-IR to the visible. Accessories include a liquid helium cryostat, heaters, and diamond anvil cells to acquire spectra from ~10 to 700 K or at pressure to 50 GPa. Two IR-microscopes are used for very small samples. This instrument is no longer maintained by its manufacturer. The problems are largely electronic. Due to its popularity and robust mechanical components, a small company has filled the market need by offering an upgrade, electronics replacement, and support for this instrument. The upgraded instrument will add to the infrastructure and will help advance fundamental issues in the geological and planetary sciences. Ongoing and planned projects use this instrument and are important to geophysics, volcanology, petrology, and planetary science. Acquiring quantitative spectra vs frequency and T will permit extrapolating to unattainable conditions and will improve understanding of the thermal state and evolution of planets. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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