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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE & STATE UNIVERSITY
Doing Business As Name:Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
PD/PI:
  • Kevin Wang
  • (540) 231-7547
  • kevinwgy@vt.edu
Award Date:11/29/2017
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 526,930
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 526,930
  • FY 2018=$526,930
Start Date:01/01/2018
End Date:12/31/2022
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.041
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:CAREER: MULTIPHASE FLUID-MATERIAL INTERACTION: CAVITATION MODELING AND DAMAGE ASSESSMENT
Federal Award ID Number:1751487
DUNS ID:003137015
Parent DUNS ID:003133790
Program:FLUID DYNAMICS
Program Officer:
  • Ronald Joslin
  • (703) 292-7030
  • rjoslin@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:Sponsored Programs 0170
City:BLACKSBURG
State:VA
ZIP:24061-0001
County:Blacksburg
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:09

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Street:460 Old Turner St.
City:Blacksburg
State:VA
ZIP:24061-0001
County:Blacksburg
Country:US
Cong. District:09

Abstract at Time of Award

Cavitation describes the formation, growth, and violent collapse of bubbles in a liquid when exposed to rapid pressure variations. If carefully controlled, cavitation can be a unique approach for high-precision material modification and fabrication, as it allows high-intensity energy pulses to be generated safely, released remotely, and focused within a small target region. The goal of this project is to understand how cavitation affects solid materials close to the bubbles; and to use this knowledge to be able to predict how cavitation modifies nearby material. The proposed research will provide new scientific insight for a broad range of engineering and biomedical applications, from fabricating materials to curing diseases. The educational and outreach component of the project will directly impact the education of K-12 schoolchildren in Central and Western Virginia, through collaboration with the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity at Virginia Tech and the Science Museum of Western Virginia in Roanoke, VA. Previous research on cavitation has primarily focused on either the fluid part of the problem, without considering the material's response, or the material part, particularly the macroscopic fracture (e.g., pits, cracks, holes) after multiple cycles of bubble collapse. This project will start with developing and experimentally validating a computational fluid dynamics/computational solid dynamics - coupled model, which will enable direct numerical simulation of up to hundreds of bubbles interacting with a broad range of materials, including fluid-induced damage and fracture. Next, the comprehensive characterization of single bubbles, tandem bubbles, and small bubble clusters collapsing near various materials will create a theoretical foundation for clarifying the micro-scale mechanisms underlying cavitation-induced material damage. Further, the direct numerical simulation model will be used to examine simplified bubbly flow models and, in combination with machine learning, design new models with improved predictive capability.

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