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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO
Doing Business As Name:Regents of the University of Idaho
PD/PI:
  • Ralph S Budwig
  • (208) 364-4996
  • rbudwig@uidaho.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Elowyn Yager
  • Daniele Tonina
  • Eric L Mittelstaedt
  • Erika Rader
Award Date:06/08/2021
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 241,902
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 241,902
  • FY 2021=$241,902
Start Date:06/15/2021
End Date:05/31/2023
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Acquisition of a Volumetric Velocimetry System
Federal Award ID Number:2043382
DUNS ID:075746271
Parent DUNS ID:075746271
Program:Instrumentation & Facilities
Program Officer:
  • Luciana Astiz
  • (703) 292-4705
  • lastiz@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:Office of Sponsored Programs
City:MOSCOW
State:ID
ZIP:83844-3020
County:Moscow
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of Idaho
Street:322 East Front Street, Suite 340
City:Boise
State:ID
ZIP:83702-7367
County:Boise
Country:US
Cong. District:02

Abstract at Time of Award

Fluid flows in nature vary intrinsically over space and time. Simultaneously mapping the flow field within a three-dimensional (3D) volume will allow the full characterization of not only the flow field, but also the pressure field and any shear and normal forces within the fluid and at boundaries. This will have a transformative impact on our ability to characterize solute mixing, particle and solute transport, and aquatic organisms, ranging from microorganisms within porous media to fish moving in a river. This project funds the acquisition of a Volumetric Velocimetry System (VVS) to support experimental research that will map flow fields in physical models of geoscience phenomena. The VVS will provide researchers the capability to acquire volumetric realizations of flow structures using this minimally invasive tool. Example applications of the system include model studies of breakout during surface lava flow which will improve prediction of when lava will arrive at specified location. In a second application, the VVS will probe critical questions about and solute and sediment grain transport in streambeds. Results from these studies will, for example, improve predictions of channel stability and be applied to the design of river restoration projects. Lastly, volumetric descriptions of the experimental flow fields from this system will be powerful tools for the validation of complex computational models, which are becoming a common investigative tool even though in many circumstances models are not benchmarked with proper data. A web presence highlighting VVS projects will provide visualizations and links to available data. A partnership with a local middle-school teacher will facilitate visits of local students to the Center for Ecohydraulics Research at University of Idaho. The acquisition of a Volumetric Velocimetry System (VVS) will enable researchers to overcome the crucial shared challenge faced by scientists and engineers who seek understanding of the fundamental nature of several types of fluid flows: the inability to acquire all three temporally and spatially resolved components of velocity data and their spatial and temporal derivatives, whose information will allow direct solution the Navier-Stokes equations retrieving information on the pressure and force distribution. Moreover, volumetric descriptions of the experimental flow fields from this system will be powerful tools for the validation of complex computational models, which are becoming a common investigative tool even though in many circumstances models are not benchmarked with proper data. Pursuing these research avenues will yield insights into geoscience phenomena, including entrainment in deep-sea hydrothermal systems and breakout during surface lava flows. In addition, coupling the VVS with the refractive index matching will probe critical questions about microbial colonization of pore interstices, turbulence dissipation at and within streambeds and its impact on organisms, and solute and sediment grain transport in streambeds. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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