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Award Detail

Awardee:BERMUDA INSTITUTE OF OCEAN SCIENCES (BIOS) INC.
Doing Business As Name:Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Inc.
PD/PI:
  • Andreas Andersson
  • (858) 822-2486
  • aandersson@ucsd.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Samantha de Putron
  • Nicholas R Bates
Award Date:09/16/2009
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 851,025
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 851,025
  • FY 2009=$851,025
Start Date:10/01/2009
End Date:09/30/2013
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:BEACON: BErmuda ocean Acidification and COral reef iNvestigation
Federal Award ID Number:0928406
DUNS ID:875635161
Program:CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY
Program Officer:
  • Henrietta Edmonds
  • (703) 292-7427
  • hedmonds@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:17 Biological Station
City:St. George's GE01
State:
ZIP:
County:
Country:BD
Awardee Cong. District:

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Inc.
Street:17 Biological Station
City:St. George's GE01
ZIP:
Country:BD

Abstract at Time of Award

Ocean acidification owing to anthropogenic emission of CO2 is a significant and imminent threat to marine calcifying organisms and ecosystems such as corals and coral reefs. As a result of future ocean acidification, i.e., increasing seawater CO2, and decreasing pH, carbonate ion concentration [CO3], and carbonate saturation state, it is likely that marine calcifiers will have difficulty growing their shells and skeletons of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) at their present rates. Dissolution of carbonate sediments and structures are also likely to increase, and could ultimately exceed calcification and CaCO3 production, leading to a transition from net accumulation to a net loss in carbonate material of individual coral colonies, coral communities and coral reef ecosystems. Because of Bermuda's relatively high-latitude location (32° N), the annual average surface seawater [CO3] is lower in Bermuda than regions closer to the tropics. As a consequence, the Bermuda coral reef is likely to experience critical [CO3] values and net dissolution before its tropical counterparts as a result of continued ocean acidification. Furthermore, a natural gradient in [CO3] exists along the Bermuda reef with environmental parameters such as, light, temperature, and nutrients being near identical. This gradient allows for unique cross-comparisons of calcification of individual calcifiers and calcifying communities under different [CO3] in a natural environment. In this study, researchers at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) will launch the BEACON project to further our understanding of the consequences of ocean acidification to the process of calcification and CaCO3 production at three different spatial scales including (1) individual coral colonies, (2) local reef communities, and (3) regional coral reef ecosystems. They will conduct (1) in situ and in vitro experiments to assess growth and evaluate net calcification of individual coral colonies of three different species common to Bermuda and the Caribbean exposed to different [CO3] under both natural and controlled experimental conditions; (2) diel and quasi-lagrangian calcification experiments to evaluate net calcification of local reef communities and in moving water masses along the natural [CO3] gradient existent on the Bermuda platform; and (3) time series data collected across the Bermuda platform and offshore, to evaluate net calcification and CaCO3 production of the Bermuda coral reef ecosystem and platform over seasonal and annual cycles. Broader impacts : This project will provide fundamental data on the consequences of ocean acidification to coral reefs on different temporal and spatial scales. Combined, knowledge at each of the scales will contribute to an improved understanding of this problem in a broader context, i.e., the effect on coral reefs as a global entity and role in the global carbon cycle during past, present and future seawater chemical conditions. As the meaning implies, the research team envisions BEACON to serve as a guiding light to assist researchers and policymakers in framing future strategies and making decisions regarding the management of coral reefs and CO2 emission policies in order to establish CO2 stabilization targets. Scientific understanding and research products from the project will be specifically used in the BIOS explorer program, CoE POGO ocean acidification module, and the coral reef ecology class taught at BIOS. It will also contribute to developing the research and technical skills of one graduate student and one research technician at BIOS, and will include the involvement of interns and NSF REU fellowship students each year of the project.

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Venti, A., Kadko, D., Andersson, A. J., Langdon, C., Bates, N. R. "A multi tracer model approach to estimate reef water residence times" Limnology and Oceanography: methods, v.10, 2012, p.1078.

Andersson, A.J., and Mackenzie, F.T. "Revisiting four scientific debates in ocean acidification research" Biogeosciences, v.9, 2012, p.1.

Andersson, A.J., and Mackenzie, F.T. "Technical comment on Kroeker et al. 2010. Meta-analysis reveals variable responses of ocean acidification on marine organisms" Ecology Letters, v.14, 2011, p.E1.

Andersson, A.J., and Mackenzie, F.T. "Ocean acidification: setting the record straight" Biogeosciences Discussion, v.8, 2011, p.6161.

Andersson, A.J., and Mackenzie, F.T. "Ocean acidification: setting the record straight" Biogeosciences Discussion, v.8, 2011, p.6161.

Andersson, A. J. "The oceanic CaCO3 cycle" Treatise in Geochemistry 2nd edition, v.8, 2013, p.519. doi:10.1016/B978-0-08-095975-7.00619-7 

Anthony, K. R. N., Diaz-Pulido, G., Verlinden, N., Tilbrook, B., and Andersson, A. J "Benthic buffers and boosters of ocean acidification on coral reefs" Biogeosciences, v.10, 2013, p.4897.

Bates, N.R., Amat, A., and Andersson, A.J. "Feedbacks and responses of coral calcification on the Bermuda reef system to seasonal changes in biological processes and ocean acidification" Biogeosciences, v.7, 2010, p.2509.

Andersson, A. J., and Gledhill, D. "Ocean acidification and coral reefs: Effects on breakdown, dissolution and net ecosystem calcification" Annual Reviews, v.5, 2013, p.. doi:10.1146/annurev-marine-121211-172241 

Andersson, A. J., and Gledhill, D. "Ocean acidification and coral reefs: Effects on breakdown, dissolution and net ecosystem calcification" Annual Reviews, v.5, 2013, p.. doi:10.1146/annurev-marine-121211-172241 

Andersson, A. J., Yeakel, K., Bates, N. R., and de Putron, S. "Partial offsets in ocean acidification from changing coral reef biogeochemistry" Nature Climate Change, v., 2013, p.. doi:10.1038/NCLIMATE2050 

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