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Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION
Doing Business As Name:Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
PD/PI:
  • Simon R Thorrold
  • (508) 289-3366
  • sthorrold@whoi.edu
Award Date:08/06/2009
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 789,995
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 789,995
  • FY 2009=$789,995
Start Date:01/01/2010
End Date:09/30/2013
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040101 RRA RECOVERY ACT
Award Title or Description:Larval Dispersal and Retention Among Sub-populations of Coral Reef Fishes: A Multi-Technique Approach
Federal Award ID Number:0928442
DUNS ID:001766682
Parent DUNS ID:001766682
Program:BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Awardee Location

Street:183 OYSTER POND ROAD
City:WOODS HOLE
State:MA
ZIP:02543-1041
County:Woods Hole
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:09

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Street:183 OYSTER POND ROAD
City:WOODS HOLE
State:MA
ZIP:02543-1041
County:Woods Hole
Country:US
Cong. District:09

Abstract at Time of Award

This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). Population connectivity, the degree to which geographically-separated groups are linked by dispersal, is a critical parameter in the dynamics of marine populations. Connectivity rates determine colonization patterns of new habitats, the resiliency of populations to harvest, and the design of networks of No Take Marine Reserves (NTMRs). Quantifying exchange rates in marine organisms is extremely difficult because natal origins of adults are almost invariably unknown. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to the difficulty of conducting mark-recapture studies in species with large numbers of small pelagic offspring that suffer high initial mortality rates. This project will continue a multi-technique approach combining mass-marking of fish embryos using TRAnsgenerational Isotope Labeling (TRAIL) of otoliths and paternity analyses based on hypervariable microsatellite DNA markers to measure dispersal distances of coral reef fishes. Population connectivity will be estimated for two species (Amphiprion percula and Chaetodon vagabundus) in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Coral reef organisms are usually distributed across a mosaic of reefs that are sometimes separated by the ocean. It has been presumed that at small scales, reefs must be open populations, with significant exchange of larvae among neighboring reefs. At larger scales, populations must effectively be closed, with late-stage larvae returning to the same population as their parents. The scale over which this transition takes place is unknown. Recent evidence suggests that ecologically significant self-recruitment may occur at scales of individual reefs or islands. If accurate, these findings have important implications for management strategies for marine species, including the design of networks of NTMRs, because knowledge of dispersal distances determines the scale over which populations can be completely protected. It also determines the appropriate spacing of reserves to allow protected populations to replenish adjacent fished areas. This project will quantify population connectivity of coral reef fishes in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea and broaden the spatial scale from examining the fate of larvae spawned at a single location (Kimbe Island) to examining connectivity among 5 designated NTMRs. The project will strengthen international collaborations among researchers from the US, Australia and France with expertise in otolith geochemistry, reef fish ecology, and population genetics. This collaboration includes the training of a graduate student. Research from the project will also be incorporated into courses taught by the PI. The research is highly relevant to ongoing conservation efforts in Kimbe Bay (led by The Nature Conservancy) and a new and ambitious six-nation effort to protect and manage coral reefs within the Coral Triangle. A major focus of the Coral Triangle Initiative will be ecosystem-based management and the design and implementation of a network of NTMRs. Estimates of population connectivity will, therefore, be vital to establish a strong scientific basis for management efforts.

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Buston, P. M., G. P. Jones, S. Planes, and S. R. Thorrold "Probability of successful larval dispersal declines fivefold over 1 km in a coral reef fish" Proc. R. Soc. B., v.279, 2012, p.1883-1888.

Berumen, M. L., G. Almany, S. Planes, G. P. Jones, and S. R. Thorrold "Persistence of self-recruitment and patterns of larval connectivity in a marine protected area network" Ecol. Evol., v.2, 2012, p.444-452.

Dixson, D. L., G. P. Jones, P. L. Munday, S. Planes, M. S. Pratchett and S. R. Thorrold "Experimental evaluation of imprinting as a mechanism for habitat selection in a coral reef fish" Oecologia, v.174, 2014, p.99-107.

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold and S. Planes "Patterns and persistence of larval retention and connectivity in a marine fish metapopulation" Mol. Ecol., v.21, 2012, p.4695-4705.

Dixson, D. L., G. P. Jones, P. L. Munday, M. S. Pratchett, M. Srinivasan, S. Planes and S. R. Thorrold "Terrestrial chemical cues help coral reef fish larvae locate settlement habitat surrounding islands" Ecol. Evol., v.1, 2011, p.586-595.

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold, and S. Planes. "Connectivity dominates larval replenishment in a coastal reef fish metapopulation" Proc. R. Soc. B, v.278, 2011, p.2954-2961.

Dixson, D. L., G. P. Jones, P. L. munday, M. S. Pratchett, M. Srinivasan, S. Planes, and S. R. Thorrold "Terrestrial chemical cues help coral reef fish larvae locate settlement habitat surrounding islands" Ecology and Evolution, v.1, 2011, p.586.

Berumen, M. L., G. Almany, S. Planes, G. P. Jones, and S. R. Thorrold "Persistence of self-recruitment and patterns of larval connectivity in a marine protected area network" Ecology and Evolution, v.2, 2012, p..

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold, and S. Planes "Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations" Coral Reefs, v.30, 2011, p.497.

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold, and S. Planes. "Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations" Coral Reefs, v.30, 2011, p.497-506.

Harrison, H. B., D. H. Williamson, R. D. Evans, G. R. Almany, S. R. Thorrold, G. R. Russ, K. A. Feldheim, L. van Herwerden, S. Planes, M. Srinivasan, M. L. Berumen, and G. P. Jones "Larval export from marine reserves benefits fish and fisheries" Current Biology, v.22, 2012, p.1023.

Harrison, H. B., D. H. Williamson, R. D. Evans, G. R. Almany, S. R. Thorrold, G. R. Russ, K. A. Feldheim, L. van Herwerden, S. Planes, M. Srinivasan, M. L. Berumen, and G. P. Jones "Larval export from marine reserves benefits fish and fisheries" Curr. Biol., v.22, 2012, p.1023-1028.

Buston, P. M., G. P. Jones, S. Planes, and S. R. Thorrold "Probability of successful larval dispersal declines fivefold over 1 kilometre in a coral reef fish" Proc. Royal Soc. B, v.279, 2011, p..

Berumen, M. L., H. J. Walsh, N. Raventos, S. Planes, G. P. Jones, V. Starczak, and S. R. Thorrold. "Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae" Coral Reefs, v.29, 2010, p.883-891.

Roy, A. S., A. J. Frisch, C. Sims, S. R. Thorrold, and G. P. Jones "Retention of a transgenerational marker (137Ba) in tissues of adult female anemone fish and assessment of physiological stress" Environmental Biology of Fishes, v., 2012, p.. doi:DOI 10.1007/s10641-012-0029-y 

Almany, G. R., R. Hamilton, M. Matawai, M. Bode, T. Potuku, P. Saenz-Agudelo, S. Planes, M. Berumen, K. Rhodes, S. R. Thorrold, G. Russ and G. P. Jones "Dispersal of grouper larvae drives resource sharing in a coral reef fishery" Curr. Biol., v.23, 2013, p.626-630.

Roy, A. S., A. J. Frisch, C. Syms, S. R. Thorrold, and G. P. Jones "Retention of a transgenerational marker (137Barium) in tissues of adult female anemonefish and assessment of physiological stress" Environ. Biol. Fishes, v.96, 2013, p.459-466.

Berumen, M. L., H. J. Walsh, N. Raventos, S. Planes, G. P. Jones, V. Starczak, and S. R. Thorrold "Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae" Coral Reefs, v.29, 2010, p.883.

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold, and S. Planes "Connectivity dominates larval replenishment in a coastal reef fish metapopulation" Proc. Royal Soc. B, v.278, 2011, p.2954.

Saenz-Agudelo, P., G. P. Jones, S. R. Thorrold, and S. Planes "Patterns and persistence of larval retention and connectivity in a marine fish metapopulation" Molecular Ecology, v.21, 2012, p.4695.

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