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Award Detail

Awardee:BIGELOW LABORATORY FOR OCEAN SCIENCES
Doing Business As Name:Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences
PD/PI:
  • Michael Lomas
  • (207) 315-2567
  • mlomas@bigelow.org
Award Date:07/18/2013
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 603,470
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 747,564
  • FY 2017=$105,739
  • FY 2015=$144,093
  • FY 2013=$173,960
  • FY 2016=$66,481
  • FY 2014=$257,291
Start Date:08/01/2013
End Date:07/31/2018
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Collaborative Research: The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study: Sustained Biogeochemical, Ecosystem, and Ocean Change Observations and Linkages in the Subtropical North Atlantic.
Federal Award ID Number:1258836
DUNS ID:077474757
Program:Chemical Oceanography
Program Officer:
  • Henrietta Edmonds
  • (703) 292-7427
  • hedmonds@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:60 Bigelow Drive
City:East Boothbay
State:ME
ZIP:04544-0380
County:East Boothbay
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences
Street:17 Biological Station
City:St George's
ZIP:
Country:BD

Abstract at Time of Award

Long-term time series are a powerful tool for investigating ocean physics and biogeochemistry, its effects on the global carbon cycle, and its response to climate change. In particular, the research goals of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) have been, and continue to be, improving our understanding of the time-varying components of the ocean carbon cycle, related biogenic elements of interest (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus, silica), and identifying the relevant physical, chemical and ecosystem properties responsible for this variability. The existing 24 years of data from BATS provide robust constraints on seasonal and year-over-year variability, the response of the Sargasso Sea ecosystem to natural climate variability and detection of potential climate change signals. Multi-decadal observations at BATS also provide critically needed rates of change in the ocean carbon cycle, CO2 sinks-sources in the North Atlantic and the longest global record of ocean acidification. Throughout its twenty-five years of operation, the objectives of BATS have been: (1) to document the temporal variability in nutrient cycles and biological communities; (2) to quantify the role of ocean-atmosphere coupling and climate forcing on air-sea exchange of CO2, and carbon export to the ocean interior; (3) to study the role of physical forcing (e.g., surface fluxes of heat, freshwater and momentum) on planktonic community structure and function, including new and export productivity; (4) to study the role of climate-induced variability in surface fluxes on planktonic community structure and function, and (5) to provide for development/validation of new oceanographic tools and technologies. This renewal award to BIOS and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences will provide funding to continue the BATS program through years 26-30. While continuing the core goals, the research team will address several new long-term questions that have developed from the previous BATS data. These questions are related to the: (1) impact of eddies on interannual variability in winter mixing; (2) detection of climate change signals in surface and deep waters of the Sargasso; (3) impact of ocean acidification on primary production, partitioning of freshly produced organic carbon between dissolved and particulate phases and remineralization of sedimenting carbon; (4) coupling of particulate and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, controlling mechanisms and their relationships to the canonical Redfield Ratio, and; (5) reconciliation of integrative geochemical estimates of carbon export and the variety of observational records of carbon export. Broader Impacts: The BATS program has strong and diverse broader impacts, contributing to the field of ocean sciences by providing high quality ocean observations and data for empiricists and modelers, and a framework from which researchers can conceive and test hypotheses. Indeed, a number of focused process-oriented research programs (e.g., EDDIES, TROPHIC BATS) have spun off from hypotheses arising from BATS data. BATS and these related programs continue to generate a large number of well-cited publications that make important contributions to the field and advance our understanding of the oceans. PIs of the BATS program have been and continue to be dedicated to the training and mentorship of both undergraduate and graduate students (including those with direct BATS PIs supervision and others via ancillary programs). The oceanographic facilities at BIOS allow the project team to train students and technicians and to collaborate with other researchers in a manner few other institutions can provide. Through hands-on laboratory, cruise and data synthesis activities, BATS will continue to directly aid the U.S. national effort to improve the understanding of the oceanic carbon cycle and the impact on global climate

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Neuer, S., H. Benway, N. Bates, C. Carlson, M. Church, M. DeGrandpre, J. Dunne, R. Letelier, M. Lomas, L. Lorenzoni, F. Muller-Karger, M. J. Perry, P. Quay "Monitoring ocean change in the 21st Century." EOS, v.98, 2017, p.2017EO080.

Fawcett, S.E. Ward, B.B., Lomas, M.W., Sigman, D.M.. "Vertical decoupling of nitrate assimilation and nitrification in the Sargasso Sea." Deep Sea Research I, v.103, 2015, p.64.

Singh, A., Baer, S., Riebesell, U., Martiny, A.C., Lomas, M.W. "C:N:P stoichiometry in the dissolved and particulate matter at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site." Biogeosciences, v.12, 2015, p.6389.

Wallhead, P.J., Garcon, V.C., Casey, J.R., Lomas, M.W. "Long-term variability of phytoplankton carbon biomass in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v., 2014, p..

Montes, E., Muller-Karger, F., Lomas, M.W., Cianca, A., Lorenzoni, L., Habtes, S. "Decadal variability in the oxygen inventory of North Atlantic Subtropical Underwater captured by sustained, long-term oceanographic time-series observations." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.30, 2016, p.460.

Kovac, Z., Platt, T., Sathyandranath, S., Lomas, M.W. 2018. 10:915. "Extraction of photosynthesis parameters from time series measurements of in situ production: Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study." Journal of Remote Sensing, v.10, 2018, p.915.

Treibergs, L.A., Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Sigman, D.M. "Nitrogen isotopic response of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton to nitrate availability in Sargasso Sea surface waters." Limnology and Oceanography, v.59, 2014, p.972.

Treibergs, L.A., Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Sigman, D.M. "Nitrogen isotopic response of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton to nitrate availability in Sargasso Sea surface waters." Limnology and Oceanography, v.59, 2014, p.972.

Teng, Y-C., Primeau, F.W., Moore, J.K., Lomas, M.W., Martiny, A.C. "Global patterns of carbon to phosphorus ratios in exported marine organic matter inferred from a biogeochemical inverse model." Nature Geoscience, v.7, 2014, p.895.

Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Ward, B.B., Sigman, D.M. "The effect of summer-to-winter mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.28, 2014, p.86.

Singh, A., Baer, S., Riebesell, U., Martiny, A.C., Lomas, M.W. "C:N:P stoichiometry in the dissolved and particulate matter at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site." Biogeosciences, v.12, 2015, p.6389.

Talarmin, A., Lomas, M.W., Bozec, Y., Savoye, N., Frigstad, H., Karl, D.M., Martiny, A.C. "Temporal variability in particulate organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus ratios in the ocean." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.30, 2016, p.1699.

Treibergs, L.A., Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Sigman, D.M. "Nitrogen isotopic response of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton to nitrate availability in Sargasso Sea surface waters." Limnology and Oceanography, v.59, 2014, p.972.

Tin, H.C., Lomas, M.W., Ishizaka, J. "Satellite-derived estimates of primary production during the Sargasso Sea winter/spring bloom: integration of in-situ time-series data and ocean color remote sensing observations" Regional Studies in Marine Science, v.3, 2015, p.131.

Wallhead, P.J., Garcon, V.C., Casey, J.R., Lomas, M.W. "Long-term variability of phytoplankton carbon biomass in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.28, 2014, p.825.

Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Ward, B.B., Sigman, D.M. "The effect of summer-to-winter mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.28, 2014, p.86.

Montes, E., Muller-Karger, F., Lomas, M.W., Cianca, A., Lorenzoni, L., Habtes, S. "Decadal variability in the oxygen inventory of North Atlantic Subtropical Underwater captured by sustained, long-term oceanographic time-series observations." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.30, 2016, p.460. doi:doi:10.1002/2015GB005183 

Teng, Y-C., Primeau, F.W., Moore, J.K., Lomas, M.W., Martiny, A.C "Global patterns of carbon to phosphorus ratios in exported marine organic matter inferred from a biogeochemical inverse model." Nature Geoscience, v., 2014, p..

Singh, A., Baer, S.E., Riebesell, U., Martiny, A.C., Lomas, M.W. "C:N:P stoichiometry at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series station in the North Atlantic Ocean" Biogeosciences Discussion, v.12, 2015, p.9275.

Tin, H.C., Lomas, M.W., Ishizaki, J. "Satellite-derived estimates of primary production during the Sargasso Sea winter/spring bloom: integration of in-situ time-series data and ocean color remote sensing observations." Regional Studies in Marine Science, v.3, 2015, p.131.

Fawcett, S.E., Lomas, M.W., Ward, B.B., Sigman, D.M. "The effect of summer-to-winter mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v., 2014, p.. doi:DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004579 

Teng, Y-C., Primeau, F.W., Moore, J.K., Lomas, M.W., Martiny, A.C "Global patterns of carbon to phosphorus ratios in exported marine organic matter inferred from a biogeochemical inverse model." Nature Geoscience, v.7, 2014, p.895.

Fawcett, S.E., Ward, B.B., Lomas, M.W., Sigman, D. "Vertical decoupling of nitrate assimilation and nitrification in the Sargasso Sea" Deep Sea Research I, v.103, 2015, p.64.

Wallhead, P.J., Garcon, V.C., Casey, J.R., Lomas, M.W. "Long-term variability of phytoplankton carbon biomass in the Sargasso Sea." Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v.28, 2014, p.825.


Project Outcomes Report

Disclaimer

This Project Outcomes Report for the General Public is displayed verbatim as submitted by the Principal Investigator (PI) for this award. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this Report are those of the PI and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation; NSF has not approved or endorsed its content.

The oceans sustain essential ecological processes and have a major influence on energy flows, weather patterns, global climate, and habitability of the planet for human life.  Long-term observational time series are a powerful and necessary tool for investigating the ocean to understand how it changes in time and the underlying drivers. For example, recent modeling studies have suggested that time-series need to be of 20-30 years (at the equator) and 40 years (temperate latitudes) duration before variability in photosynthesis due to societal activities can be separated from natural variability.   The broad research goal of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program has been, and continues to be, improving our understanding of the “time-varying” components of the ocean carbon cycle, related biogenic elements (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus, silica), and identifying the relevant physical, chemical and ecosystem properties responsible for the observed variability. The specific objectives of BATS are to: (1) document the temporal variability in nutrient cycles and biological communities; (2) quantify the role of ocean-atmosphere coupling and climate forcing on air-sea exchange of CO2, and carbon export to the ocean depths; (3) study the role of physical forcing (e.g., surface fluxes of heat, freshwater and momentum) on planktonic community structure and function; (4) study the role of climate-induced variability on planktonic community structure and function, and (5) provide a platform for development/validation of new oceanographic tools and technologies.

 

The existing 30 years of data at BATS provide robust constraints on seasonal and year-over-year variability, the response of the Sargasso Sea ecosystem to natural climate variability and detection of potential climate change signals. During this award period, in addition to the core goals of BATS, we addressed several new “long-term” questions that have developed from the previous BATS observations. These questions are related to the: (1) impact of eddies on interannual variability in winter convective mixing; (2) detection of climate change signals in surface and deep waters of the Sargasso; (3) impact of ocean acidification on key ecosystem processes (e.g., photosynthesis, carbon sequestration); (4) coupling of particulate and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, controlling mechanisms and how this information is included on ocean and ecosystem models, and; (5) reconciliation of different methods to estimate the oceans ability to sequester organic carbon.

 

The BATS program makes strong contributions to the field of ocean sciences by providing high quality ocean observations and data for empiricists and modelers, and a framework from which researchers can conceive and test hypotheses. Indeed, a number of focused process-oriented research programs have spun off from hypotheses arising from BATS data. BATS and these related programs continue to generate a large number of well-cited publications that make important contributions to the field and advance our understanding of the oceans and their global role. Principle investigators of the BATS program have been and continue to be dedicated to the training and mentorship of both national and international undergraduate and graduate students. The oceanographic facilities at BIOS allow the program to train students and technicians and collaborate with other researchers in a manner few other institutions can provide. Through hands-on laboratory, cruise and data synthesis activities, BATS will continue to directly aid the U.S. national effort to improve the understanding of the oceanic carbon cycle and the impact on global climate. 

 


Last Modified: 09/25/2018
Modified by: Michael Lomas

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