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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ
Doing Business As Name:University of California-Santa Cruz
PD/PI:
  • James A Estes
  • (831) 459-2820
  • jestes@ucsc.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Matthew S Edwards
Award Date:06/19/1998
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 45,769
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 45,769
  • FY 1998=$45,769
Start Date:07/01/1998
End Date:06/30/2000
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:490100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Diaster and Recovery in Kelp Forest Communities: Effects of the El Nino Southern Oscillation Events in the Northeast Pacific
Federal Award ID Number:9813562
DUNS ID:125084723
Parent DUNS ID:071549000
Program:BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Awardee Location

Street:1156 High Street
City:Santa Cruz
State:CA
ZIP:95064-1077
County:Santa Cruz
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:20

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of California-Santa Cruz
Street:1156 High Street
City:Santa Cruz
State:CA
ZIP:95064-1077
County:Santa Cruz
Country:US
Cong. District:20

Abstract at Time of Award

The study is designed to determine the effects of the current (1997-98) El Ni¹o event on the nearshore giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) communities throughout this species entire range (central Baja, Mexico to A¹o Nuevo, California; see Foster & Schiel, 1985 for a review on giant kelp distribution). The current (1997-98) El Ni¹o is considered one of the strongest on record (NOAA Multivariate ENSO Index) with widespread, storm-induced damage already occurring along much of the eastern Pacific. In addition to widespread damage to terrestrial environments from flooding and strong winds, unusually large ocean waves have impacted the coast of California and Baja, having severe impacts on their coastal marine systems. To examine the effects of the current El Ni¹o event on the giant kelp forests of this region, field surveys will be done to compare changes in their community structure resulting from large ocean waves and increased sea temperatures before, during and after this event, and throughout their entire range in this region. Collected data will be supplemented by unpublished data from the PI's as well as published research on kelps in the area. Altogether, these data will allow for evaluation of both inter- and intraannual variation in the structure of giant kelp communities along their entire distribution in the Pacific Northeast, with specific attention on years characterized by El Ni¹o and La Ni¹a events, and provide valuable information on the relative importance of various oceanographic conditions on these changes.

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