Skip directly to content

Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
Doing Business As Name:University of Miami
PD/PI:
  • Sharon L Smith
  • (305) 421-4819
  • sharon.smith@rsmas.miami.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Nasseer A Idrisi
  • Donald B Olson
Award Date:06/26/2000
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 550,000
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 550,000
  • FY 2000=$550,000
Start Date:07/01/2000
End Date:06/30/2004
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:490100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Diapause, Population Dynamics, and the Large-Scale Dispersal of Zooplankton
Federal Award ID Number:9911494
DUNS ID:152764007
Parent DUNS ID:004146619
Program:BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Awardee Location

Street:4600 RICKENBACKER CSWY
City:Key Biscayne
State:FL
ZIP:33149-1031
County:Key Biscayne
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:27

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of Miami
Street:4600 RICKENBACKER CSWY
City:Key Biscayne
State:FL
ZIP:33149-1031
County:Key Biscayne
Country:US
Cong. District:27

Abstract at Time of Award

This study will examine the population dynamics of two dominant grazing copepod species, Calanoides carinatus and Eucalanus crassus, in the context of a coupled biological?physical model in the northwestern Indian Ocean. The model populations will include a diapausing fifth copepodite stage (CV) believed to have evolved as the result of a predictably intermittent food supply associated with upwelling caused by seasonal monsoonal forcing within the region. The primary objectives of this study are: 1) to determine the significance of ontogenetic migration and diapause of the copepods Calanoides carinatus and Eucalanus crassus for the success of these populations in the northwestern and equatorial Indian Ocean, with respect to timing of migration and onset and collapse of phytoplankton blooms associated with monsoonal upwelling; 2) to test hypotheses of mechanisms underlying the initiation and cessation of diapause in CV stage of C. carinatus and E. crassus; and 3) to ascertain the importance of physical advection in transporting populations to the Oman coast, Gulf of Aden and Gulf of Oman, and potentially more distant areas such as Mozambique and Java, using the Great Whirl off Somalia as the epicenter of distribution of C. carinatus and E. crassus.

For specific questions or comments about this information including the NSF Project Outcomes Report, contact us.