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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO
Doing Business As Name:University of Idaho
PD/PI:
  • Mark Coleman
  • (208) 885-6651
  • mcoleman@uidaho.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Paul E Gessler
  • George Newcombe
  • Stephen Cook
  • Marc Rust
Award Date:01/21/2010
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 400,000
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 410,000
  • FY 2010=$90,000
  • FY 2014=$80,000
  • FY 2012=$80,000
  • FY 2013=$80,000
  • FY 2011=$80,000
Start Date:02/01/2010
End Date:01/31/2016
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.041
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:University of Idaho-College of Natural Resources Proposal for Participation in the NSF Center for Advanced Forestry Systems
Federal Award ID Number:0968821
DUNS ID:075746271
Parent DUNS ID:075746271
Program:IUCRC-Indust-Univ Coop Res Ctr

Awardee Location

Street:Office of Sponsored Programs
City:MOSCOW
State:ID
ZIP:83844-3020
County:Moscow
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of Idaho
Street:Office of Sponsored Programs
City:MOSCOW
State:ID
ZIP:83844-3020
County:Moscow
Country:US
Cong. District:01

Abstract at Time of Award

IIP 0968821 University of Idaho Coleman University of Idaho (UI) is planning to join the existing multi-university Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) entitled "The Center for Advanced Forestry Systems" (CAFS) which was established in 2007 with four member institutions: North Carolina State University (lead university), Oregon State University, Purdue University and Virginia Tech. Since then other universities have joined this Center: the University of Maine, the University of Washington, the University of Georgia and the University of Florida. The primary focus of the proposed research site within CAFS will be to provide additional and specialized expertise and research platforms in the areas of endophyte selection and deployment, seed orchard pest protection and geospatial projections. The proposed activities at UI will augment current CAFS projects, and will more fully address the needs for scientific and technological advances for enhancing the competitiveness of the US forestry sector. The effort at the University of Idaho has the potential to improve the competitiveness of the forest products industry by solving key problems using applied research and enhanced institutional collaboration. The community will benefit from refereed publications and presentations at scientific meetings focusing on key nationwide research questions. The proposed work at the University of Idaho will expand training of graduate students with unique interdisciplinary skill sets. The proposed site also has a plan to address diversity issues in this field.

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Cook, S. P. Sloniker, B. D. Rust, M. L. "Using Systemically Applied Insecticides for Management of Ponderosa Pine Cone Beetle and Dioryctria Coneworms in Seed Orchards" Western Journal of Applied Forestry, v.28, 2013, p.66. doi:10.5849/wjaf.12-020 

Cook SP, Sloniker BD, Rust ML "Efficacy of Two Bole-Injected Systemic Insecticides for Protecting Douglas-Fir From Damage by Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth and Fir Coneworm" West J App For, v.28, 2013, p.166-169. doi:10.5849/wjaf.13-002 

Ridout, M. and Newcombe, G. "The frequency of modification of Dothistroma pine needle blight severity by fungi within the native range" For Ecol Manag, v.337, 2015, p.153. doi:j.foreco.2014.11.010 

Sloniker BD, Cook SP "Differential acceptability of conifer hosts to feeding by western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera: Coreidae)" Trends in Entomology, v.10, 2014, p.1-10.

Ridout M, Newcombe G "The frequency of modification of Dothistroma pine needle blight severity by fungi within the native range" For Ecol Manage, v.337, 2015, p.153-160. doi:0378-1127 

Cook SP, Sloniker BD, Rust ML "Using Systemically Applied Insecticides for Management of Ponderosa Pine Cone Beetle and Dioryctria Coneworms in Seed Orchards" West J App For, v.28, 2013, p.66-70. doi:10.5849/wjaf.12-020 

Cook, S. P. Sloniker, B. D. Rust, M. L. "Efficacy of Two Bole-Injected Systemic Insecticides for Protecting Douglas-Fir From Damage by Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth and Fir Coneworm" Western Journal of Applied Forestry, v.28, 2013, p.166. doi:10.5849/wjaf.13-002 

Sloniker, B.D. and Cook, S.P. "Differential acceptability of conifer hosts to feeding by western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Heteroptera: Coreidae)" Trends in Entomology, v.10, 2014, p.1.


Project Outcomes Report

Disclaimer

This Project Outcomes Report for the General Public is displayed verbatim as submitted by the Principal Investigator (PI) for this award. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this Report are those of the PI and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation; NSF has not approved or endorsed its content.

Due to population growth and increasing standards of living there is growing demand for advanced renewable materials including wood, paper, power, composites, polymers, and liquid fuels .  There is also increased recognition that forests will produce these products indefinitely if managers maintain the quality of soil in which trees are grown.  Yet while demand is increasing, the productive forest land base is shrinking.  To address this forest product supply and demand conflict, the University of Idaho conducted several projects to improve forest productivity through participation in the NSF Center for Advanced Forestry Systems (CAFS).  These UIdaho CAFS projects included tree seed orchard protection from pests, isolation and testing of endophytic microbes that are capable of enhancing growth and pathogen resistance, development of genetic markers to aid breeding and selection of superior tree varieties, and management of stand density to enhance forest health and vigor.  Each of these projects had significant outcomes and important impacts. 

Seed orchard protection work demonstrated the superiority of the insecticide emamectin benzoate to control cone beetle and cone worm in Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine.  Based on these results, industry partners are operationally applying systemic insecticides to control seed orchard pests in areas where broadcast insecticide applications may not be efficient or desirable

A better understanding of western conifer seed bug feeding habits and reproductive success could provide insight for developing additional control measures of this common yet difficult to monitor seed orchard pest. We found that adult females oviposited more frequently on ponderosa pine, and nymphs survived longest and were most likely to complete development on lodgepole pine than on other conifers hosts.  This information then allows us to focus control on pine species. 

Modifying microbial communities through inoculations of select endophytes can provide control for pathogens.  We found that inoculation of ponderosa pine needles with endophytic fungi modifies the disease severity of red-banded needle blight, both positively and negatively depending on the endophyte used.  We found that inoculating seedlings with naturally occurring conifer root endophytes reduces seedling mortality from nursery pathogens. Other forest root endophytes reduce fecundity of Fusarium species, which are severe pathogens in forest nurseries.  Incorporation of forest endophytes into conifers nursery production of seedlings for reforestation and plantation establishment may increase out-planting survival and reduce fungicide use. 

To develop genetic markers to aid breeding and selection for western white pine, we tested markers on samples from the Bingham Seed Orchard and found over 50 markers to be useful.  We then conducted simulation studies to estimate the number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers needed to differentiate offspring with common parentage.  The simulation showed that the high degree of relatedness of trees at Bingham would require about 200 SNPs to ensure a high degree of accuracy of parental reconstruction. With costs of SNP genotyping continuing to decline and because of previous success with Douglas fir using modern sequencing techniques, we decided to broaden the scope to develop 20,000 SNP markers for genomic selection in both Douglas-fir and Western white pine. Once developed during Phase II of CAFS, these markers will provide a broad platform for future studies aimed at examining the relationships between important traits and specific SNP markers. 

To enhance forest health and vigor through stand density management, we are monitoring both thinned plots and plots reserved from thinning at over 60 locations throughout the Inland Nort...

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