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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:RESEARCH FOUNDATION FOR THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, THE
Doing Business As Name:SUNY at Stony Brook
PD/PI:
  • Qingzhi Zhu
  • (631) 632-8747
  • qing.zhu@stonybrook.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Robert C Aller
Award Date:08/22/2008
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 672,183
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 672,183
  • FY 2008=$672,183
Start Date:09/01/2008
End Date:08/31/2012
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Immunosensors for water column and 2-D sediment distributions of vitamin B-12 and target organic solutes
Federal Award ID Number:0752105
DUNS ID:804878247
Parent DUNS ID:020657151
Program:OCEAN TECH & INTERDISC COORDIN
Program Officer:
  • Kandace Binkley
  • (703) 292-7577
  • kbinkley@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:WEST 5510 FRK MEL LIB
City:Stony Brook
State:NY
ZIP:11794-0001
County:Stony Brook
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:01

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:SUNY at Stony Brook
Street:WEST 5510 FRK MEL LIB
City:Stony Brook
State:NY
ZIP:11794-0001
County:Stony Brook
Country:US
Cong. District:01

Abstract at Time of Award

The PI's request funding to develop ELISA methods for determination of vitamin B12 in coastal seawater and sediment pore water using both steady and time-resolved fluorescence technologies. A flow injection immunosensor based on immunoaffinity solid-phase extraction will allow rapid in-situ measurement of ultra trace B12 in seawater either by remote control technology, or on board ship. A new fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) planar immunosensor, optimized based on the overlying water methodology, will be utilized for in-situ mapping of 2-dimensional vitamin B12 distribution and transport patterns in bottom deposits. Vitamin B12 is a microbially produced compound specifically required by phytoplankton for primary production in aquatic systems. It is representative of multiple trace organometallic compounds essential for biological growth and functioning, and has major sources from heterotrophic microbial communities in sediments. Its importance in phytoplankton ecology is just beginning to be understood, and the distribution, transport and factors controlling production patterns of B12 and other biogenic organometallics in marine sediments are essentially undocumented due to lack of suitable analytical tools. The capability for rapid and accurate quantitative or qualitative reconnaissance of vitamin B12 in situ would significantly advance knowledge of biogeochemical cycling of vitamins and related compounds, further reveal the influence of B12 on primary productivity and phytoplankton growth, and provide an enhanced basis for conceptual models and practical management decisions related to nutrient cycling in coastal environments. The PI?s request funding to develop ELISA methods for determination of vitamin B12 in coastal seawater and sediment pore water using both steady and time-resolved fluorescence technologies. A flow injection immunosensor based on immunoaffinity solid-phase extraction will allow rapid in-situ measurement of ultra trace B12 in seawater either by remote control technology, or on board ship. A new fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) planar immunosensor, optimized based on the overlying water methodology, will be utilized for in-situ mapping of 2-dimensional vitamin B12 distribution and transport patterns in bottom deposits. Broader Impacts: The proposed work could revolutionize the way we analyze small biomolecules, and may have important applications in fields outside of chemical oceanography, like chemical ecology. This project has the potential develop a novel sensor that if successful would contribute significantly to our understanding of the influence of B12 in marine systems. These novel technologies (flow immunosensor, planar fluorescence) would be incorporated into graduate and undergraduate curricula, as well to local high school outreach programs to highly motivated students.

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Qingzhi Zhu, Robert C. Aller, Aleya Kaushik "Analysis of vitamin B12 in seawater and marine sediment pore water using ELISA" Limnology & Oceanography: Methods, v.9, 2011, p.515.

Zhu, Qingzhi and Aller, Robert C. "Planar fluorescence sensors for two-dimensional measurements of H2S distributions and dynamics in sedimentary deposits" Marine Chemistry, v.157, 2013, p.. doi:10.1016/j.marchem.2013.08.001 Citation details  

Liu, Zhanfei and Liu, Jiqing and Zhu, Qingzhi and Wu, Wei "The weathering of oil after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: insights from the chemical composition of the oil from the sea surface, salt marshes and sediments" Environmental Research Letters, v.7, 2012, p.. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/3/035302 Citation details  

Zhu, Qingzhi and Aller, Robert C. and Kaushik, Aleya "Analysis of vitamin B 12 in seawater and marine sediment porewater using ELISA: Vitamin B 12 analysis in seawater using ELISA" Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, v.9, 2011, p.. doi:10.4319/lom.2011.9.515 Citation details  

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