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Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:SERYX BIOMEDICAL, INC.
Doing Business As Name:Seryx Biomedical, Inc.
PD/PI:
  • Denise Barbut
  • (917) 975-1377
  • dbarbut@gmail.com
Award Date:05/19/2010
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ NaN
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 170,677
  • FY 2011=$29,605
  • FY 2010=$141,072
Start Date:07/01/2010
End Date:06/30/2011
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.041
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:SBIR Phase I: Regenerating Ocular Surface Wounds with Novel Biomaterial
Federal Award ID Number:1013484
DUNS ID:965451755
Program:SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I

Awardee Location

Street:10900 73rd Ave.
City:Maple Grove
State:MN
ZIP:55369-5458
County:Maple Grove
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:03

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Seryx Biomedical, Inc.
Street:10900 73rd Ave.
City:Maple Grove
State:MN
ZIP:55369-5458
County:Maple Grove
Country:US
Cong. District:03

Abstract at Time of Award

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will demonstrate the feasibility of healing wounds to the surface of the eye with a novel biomaterial. This biomaterial resembles a contact lens and initial animal studies show that when placed on a wounded eye it acts as a regenerative bandage that stimulates healing while simultaneously absorbing naturally over time. The broader/commercial impacts of this research are significant to the Americans that suffer from ocular surface wounds and fear loss of eyesight. A wounded eye can cause extreme pain, swelling, blurred vision, and even vision loss. Such wounds are commonly associated with house hold injuries such as chemical burns from cleaning agents, traumatic impact from items such as falling objects, or removal of a contact lens that has been left in too long. Furthermore, infections and diseases can cause corneal injury. This regenerative bandage could treat these patients with a non-invasive and less expensive procedure that saves millions to the American health care system.


Project Outcomes Report

Disclaimer

This Project Outcomes Report for the General Public is displayed verbatim as submitted by the Principal Investigator (PI) for this award. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this Report are those of the PI and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation; NSF has not approved or endorsed its content.

During the course of the Phase I study, Sarentis Ophthalmics demonstrated that it is feasible to use its novel ocular bandage to accelerate the healing of the ocular surface.  The physical design of the ocular bandage was successfully optimized and made into a well-shaped device for easy application to the eye and comfort to the eye.  The funding provided by the NSF has allowed the company to take a conceptual medical device and convert it into a physical product ready to move into production and human clinical studies.

The silk film material used in the ocular bandages provided unique challenges and opportunities in developing devices with the appropriate material properties. Significantly more material work was required during the Phase I award than anticipated in the original proposal. However, through these efforts a number of new silk material processing methods have been developed. Furthermore, greater control and understanding of silk film material properties has been realized, which will ultimately lead to a more capable platform technology with the potential adaption to a number of applications both within and outside the field of ophthalmology.

The risk of producing this device and proving its feasibility has been greatly minimized through the work supported by the Phase I award, and with continual support through Phase II the production of the first regenerative silk ocular bandages will be one step closer to reaching the market, and potentially benefiting the millions of Americans afflicted with corneal trauma each year.


Last Modified: 12/16/2011
Modified by: Denise Barbut

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