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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:ADELPHI UNIVERSITY
Doing Business As Name:Adelphi University
PD/PI:
  • Beth Christensen
  • (856) 256-5251
  • christensenb@rowan.edu
Award Date:02/28/2013
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 18,220
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 18,220
  • FY 2013=$18,220
Start Date:02/15/2013
End Date:01/31/2015
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Rapid Grant: Collaborative Investigations of the Impact of Superstorm Sandy on the South Shore of Long Island
Federal Award ID Number:1322835
DUNS ID:065972838
Parent DUNS ID:065972838
Program:Marine Geology and Geophysics
Program Officer:
  • Candace Major
  • (703) 292-7597
  • cmajor@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:South Avenue
City:Garden City
State:NY
ZIP:11530-4299
County:Garden City
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:04

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Adelphi University
Street:1 South Avenue
City:Garden City
State:NY
ZIP:11530-4213
County:Garden City
Country:US
Cong. District:04

Abstract at Time of Award

Superstorm Sandy had a historic impact on the New York and New Jersey coastlines. This collaborative Rapid Response project will assess the effect of Superstorm Sandy in estuarine and shallow coastal environments, focusing on the Western Bays and Jamaica Bay. The project will leverage pre-existing geophysical and sedimentological data collected by the PIs prior to the storm, and will complement a related field program planned by investigators at the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics. Previously sampled sites will be reoccupied for sediment sampling (gravity and box cores, grab samples) and textural and geochemical tracer analyses. Multibeam bathymetry will be collected in previously surveyed areas and will cover a new ebb-tidal delta system and smaller estuarine channels. These data will be combined with transport indicator and debris field mapping to evaluate the pathways and mechanisms of sediment transport during Superstorm Sandy. This work will lead to a better understanding of the response of the shallow seafloor to extreme storms and will help to constrain the regional sediment budget, a potentially important consideration in the rebuilding process. Graduate and undergraduate students will be involved in the research. The PIs plan to work with regional partners (South Shore Estuary Reserve, Operation Splash) and engage in public outreach.

Publications Produced as a Result of this Research

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Goff, J.A., Austin, J.A., Flood, R.D., Christensen, B., Browne, C.M. and Saustrup, S. "Rapid Response Survey Gauges Sandy?s Impact on Seafloor" Eos, v.94, 2013, p.337. doi:10.1002/2013EO390001 

Goff, J.A., Austin, J.A., Flood, R.D., Christensen, B., Browne, C.M. and Saustrup, S. "Rapid Response Survey Gauges Sandy?s Impact on Seafloor" EOS, v.v. 94-3, 2013, p.337. doi:DOI: 10.1002/2013EO390001 

Goff, J.A., Flood, R.D., Austin, J.A., Schwab, W.C., Christensen, B., Browne, C.M., Denny J.F., and Saustrup, S. "The impact of Hurricane Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf of Fire ISland, New York: large bedform migration but limited erosion." Continental Shelf Research, v.98, 2015, p.13. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csr.2015.03.001 

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