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Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY, INC
Doing Business As Name:Montana State University
PD/PI:
  • John C Priscu
  • (406) 994-3250
  • jpriscu@montana.edu
Co-PD(s)/co-PI(s):
  • Edward E Adams
Award Date:08/26/1998
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 160,799
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 160,799
  • FY 1998=$160,799
Start Date:08/15/1998
End Date:07/31/2002
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.078
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:Collaborative Research: Microbial Life within the Extreme Environment Posed by Permanent Antarctic Lake Ice
Federal Award ID Number:9815512
DUNS ID:625447982
Parent DUNS ID:079602596
Program:ANT Organisms & Ecosystems
Program Officer:
  • Polly A. Penhale
  • (703) 292-7420
  • ppenhale@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:309 MONTANA HALL
City:BOZEMAN
State:MT
ZIP:59717-2470
County:Bozeman
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:00

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:Montana State University
Street:309 MONTANA HALL
City:BOZEMAN
State:MT
ZIP:59717-2470
County:Bozeman
Country:US
Cong. District:00

Abstract at Time of Award

9815512 PRISCU Three to twenty meter thick permanent ice covers on lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctic contain viable microbial cells in association with sediment aggregates. These aggregates are now recognized as sites where physical, chemical and biological interactions promote microbial growth under extreme conditions inherent to the ice environment. This interdisciplinary research program will define specific processes which allow (1) the creation of liquid water (the essential element for life) in the permanent ice, (2) the survival and structuring of microbial populations subjected to freezing and thawing, (3) the production of substances which alter the physical attributes of the ice crystal habitat and (4) nutrient supply to the microbial populations which is essential for not only survival, but net microbial growth and biomass accumulation. The work will be on ice aggregates embedded within the permanent ice covers on the lakes in the Taylor Valley, which have been tentatively characterized in previous studies. Research on microbes in permanent ice provides information on the ecology of microbes in ice ecosystems and promises to have biotechnological implications. Furthermore, these studies will provide insights into the conditions, which support or have supported life beyond our own planet in association with water ice which is currently present within and beyond our own solar system.

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