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Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
Doing Business As Name:North Dakota State University Fargo
PD/PI:
  • Benjamin J Laabs
  • (701) 231-6197
  • benjamin.laabs@ndsu.edu
Award Date:06/02/2020
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 222,477
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 69,249
  • FY 2020=$69,249
Start Date:06/15/2020
End Date:05/31/2023
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.050
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: A TRANSPARENT-MIDDLE-LAYER COMPUTATIONAL AND DATA MANAGEMENT INFRASTRUCTURE FOR SYNOPTIC APPLICATIONS OF COSMOGENIC-NUCLIDE GEOCHEMISTRY
Federal Award ID Number:1948186
DUNS ID:803882299
Parent DUNS ID:803882299
Program:GEOINFORMATICS
Program Officer:
  • Steven Whitmeyer
  • (703) 292-8552
  • swhitmey@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:Dept 4000 - PO Box 6050
City:FARGO
State:ND
ZIP:58108-6050
County:Fargo
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:00

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:North Dakota State University Fargo
Street:P.O. Box 6050
City:Fargo
State:ND
ZIP:58108-6050
County:Fargo
Country:US
Cong. District:00

Abstract at Time of Award

This project will develop computational and data management knowledge and infrastructure to enable global-scale applications of cosmogenic-nuclide geochemistry. Cosmogenic-nuclide geochemistry is a geologic dating method that is widely used to study geologic processes active at the Earth's surface, including, for example, glacier and ice sheet change, erosion and sedimentation, tectonic deformation, and earthquake size and frequency. Cosmogenic-nuclide geochemistry does not directly measure the age of a deposit, but instead relies on geochemical properties of rocks and sediments that change over time and thus have some relation to age. Interpreting the geochemical measurements as a precise, geologically-useful age requires a series of calculations and associated data, which themselves are the subjects of active research. Thus, any synthesis of data collected in different places or at different times requires constant recalculation of ages from a growing data set of raw geochemical observations, using a continually improving method. This project focuses on developing a cyberinfrastructure system that automates calculations and makes them transparent to users interested in analysis of large data sets, and training Earth science researchers and students in how to use the system. Overall, the goal is to improve the ability of Earth science researchers to use geochronological data to study Earth surface processes. The project will develop a transparent middle-level computational infrastructure for cosmogenic-nuclide geochronology, based on a prototype that has been successful in trial applications. The resource will automate middle-level calculations, allow continual assimilation of data and improvement of calculation methods, and allow users to focus on large-scale data analysis. This research will involve: 1. expansion and professionalization of the existing prototype, 2. support for new research and education applications that involve analysis or visualization of large data sets; and 3. engagement and training of researchers and students aimed at embedding transparent middle-level concepts and infrastructure into research workflows. Overall, the aim is to build the computational infrastructure, and the community of researchers who are able and motivated to use it, that is necessary to move the field from single, site-specific investigations toward regional and global syntheses of rapidly growing data sets. In addition, elements of this project focus on integrating Earth science research and education, including: 1. a users-as-co-developers strategy for engagement and project guidance, 2. a strategy of incorporating synoptic analysis and data visualization into undergraduate teaching resources, and 3. a program of training Earth science researchers and students in computational and geospatial skills. Integrating cyberinfrastructure development into undergraduate and graduate Earth science education will build a community of students and researchers who are better prepared to succeed in both Earth science and other fields, as well as building the capability to link small-scale field research to the broader regional- or global-scale data set of similar observations. Innovative aspects of this project may provide models for enabling scientific investigation through cyberinfrastructure development in other areas of Earth science. This project is jointly funded by the Geoinformatics and the Geomorphology and Land Use Dynamics programs in the Division of Earth Sciences, as well as the Office of Polar Programs. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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