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Minimize RSR Award Detail

Research Spending & Results

Award Detail

Awardee:UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO
Doing Business As Name:University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez
PD/PI:
  • Eduardo Juan
  • (787) 832-4040
  • ejuan@ece.uprm.edu
Award Date:07/10/2020
Estimated Total Award Amount: $ 50,000
Funds Obligated to Date: $ 50,000
  • FY 2020=$50,000
Start Date:07/15/2020
End Date:12/31/2020
Transaction Type:Grant
Agency:NSF
Awarding Agency Code:4900
Funding Agency Code:4900
CFDA Number:47.041
Primary Program Source:040100 NSF RESEARCH & RELATED ACTIVIT
Award Title or Description:I-Corps: Laparoscopic Induction Heaters for Biomedical Applications
Federal Award ID Number:2019736
DUNS ID:175303262
Parent DUNS ID:090051616
Program:I-Corps
Program Officer:
  • Ruth Shuman
  • (703) 292-2160
  • rshuman@nsf.gov

Awardee Location

Street:Call Box 9000
City:Mayaguez
State:PR
ZIP:00680-9000
County:Mayaguez
Country:US
Awardee Cong. District:00

Primary Place of Performance

Organization Name:University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez
Street:Call Box 9000, Road 108 km. 1.0
City:Mayaguez
State:PR
ZIP:00680-9000
County:Mayaguez
Country:US
Cong. District:00

Abstract at Time of Award

The broader impact/commercial potential of this I-Corps project is the development of miniature induction heaters to heat electrically conductive materials in hard-to-reach places within the human body. The goal is to develop smaller, more focused magnetic field applicators that may be used in patients having metallic implants (e.g., hip replacement implants, stents, etc.) otherwise ineligible to receive current magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer therapies. Additionally, the aim is to enable the development of new medical procedures requiring in situ, non-contact heating of electrically conductive materials in relatively inaccessible places within the human body. This I-Corps project is to explore translation of miniature induction-heating devices for biomedical applications, such as in laparoscopic procedures with the intention of treating intra-peritoneal metastatic cancer such as ovarian cancer using magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). Capabilities include generating an alternating magnetic field of up to 18 kA/m at a frequency of 290kHz. With this field intensity, it is possible to heat a stainless-steel disk to more than 500°C and a suspension of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles to maximum temperatures ranging from 39°C to 96°C, depending on particle concentration. Translational research includes: a) development of novel magnetic field generators allowing a more localized MFH prostate cancer therapy, b) further exploration of the concept of having miniature induction heaters to heat electrically conductive materials in hard-to-reach places within the human body, c) determining the capabilities of the technology in heating magnetic nanoparticles to kill cancer cells in vitro and d) determining the devices' capabilities in heating magnetic nanoparticles to ablate porcine tissues and estimate severity and extent of tissue damage under different operating conditions. This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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